I skate for the Nashville Rollergirls, but all opinions are my own. Expect derby and lots of it. Possible musings as well. Donno.

 

Can’t get back to sleep, even though I am tired. Pup has had two pooping-in-her-crate episodes recently, can’t tell if something is wrong. Also, internal clock set for 5:30 now. Blah.

Watching WFTDA playoffs at home.
Prepping for evansville.  Woo WOOO. :D

Watching WFTDA playoffs at home.

Prepping for evansville.  Woo WOOO. :D

Really impressed with St. Chux.

I don’t know that they have the physical unf to deal with Detroit’s hard hitting style, but they have the best footwork and smartest play I’ve seen in the tournament

So we lost to Toronto last night

But damn if I’m not proud of how we played.  Always things to improve, but that was probably our best performance in the time that I’ve been on the Allstars.

bustingxkittens:

Edge Transitions - Trick of the Week by Kamikaze Kitten (#9, London Roller Girls)

Something to note about these:  Her front and back wheels don’t land at the same time when she hops.  Doing this gives her muscle memory a little bit of time to find the exact right line before all 4 wheels are down.

Practice your truck awareness.

derbytastic:

cobrakaiderbycoach:

There are approximately 800 rules and definitions in the 4/1/14 WFTDA ruleset. Using the arbitrary standard of “things that happen in most bouts that you have to understand in order to make it onto the bout roster for a low level team” I count 70 rules that skaters actually need to know. That’s not even 10%. Things like the direction of skating, the basics of not track cutting, maintaining a pack, equipment, that a pass is measured by your hips, no fighting, obey the refs, legal target zones, jammers behind the line/blockers in front of it, etc. - Not included are things like track layout, penalty timing, overtime rules, the glossary, optional equipment, scoring via an apex jump, star passses, touching the pivot line, etc.  What does this mean? It explains how skaters get away with not reading the rules, instead depending on word of mouth from other skaters. It shows how unrealistic it is to expect refs to have instant recall of the full ruleset. It shows that the rules are in need of a full rewrite to make a document of a size and clarity that skaters and officials can more easily digest and recall. But mostly it shows that WFTDA’s rule structure is broken at a deep structural, cultural level and not on track to get better if all they’re doing is minor revisions.

Can someone cause a coup within WFTDA so we can get shit sorted with the rules? K thanks!

I really disagree with this assessment.  See my previous post about how Rules are like requirements in software development, and how all of that shit is hard for varying reasons.
The fact that you can get by on main operating behavior does not mean that edge cases don’t need to be documented and the reaction of the system specified for those cases.  It just means that some users (players) have decided that tripping over those things when they happen is an acceptable thing, or that they can rely on more knowledgeable skaters on their line to help them manage the situation.
As a programmer, I have far too much experience with handwavy generalities that lead to confused and inconsistent implementations.

derbytastic:

cobrakaiderbycoach:

There are approximately 800 rules and definitions in the 4/1/14 WFTDA ruleset. Using the arbitrary standard of “things that happen in most bouts that you have to understand in order to make it onto the bout roster for a low level team” I count 70 rules that skaters actually need to know.

That’s not even 10%.

Things like the direction of skating, the basics of not track cutting, maintaining a pack, equipment, that a pass is measured by your hips, no fighting, obey the refs, legal target zones, jammers behind the line/blockers in front of it, etc. - Not included are things like track layout, penalty timing, overtime rules, the glossary, optional equipment, scoring via an apex jump, star passses, touching the pivot line, etc. 

What does this mean? It explains how skaters get away with not reading the rules, instead depending on word of mouth from other skaters. It shows how unrealistic it is to expect refs to have instant recall of the full ruleset. It shows that the rules are in need of a full rewrite to make a document of a size and clarity that skaters and officials can more easily digest and recall.

But mostly it shows that WFTDA’s rule structure is broken at a deep structural, cultural level and not on track to get better if all they’re doing is minor revisions.

Can someone cause a coup within WFTDA so we can get shit sorted with the rules? K thanks!

I really disagree with this assessment.  See my previous post about how Rules are like requirements in software development, and how all of that shit is hard for varying reasons.

The fact that you can get by on main operating behavior does not mean that edge cases don’t need to be documented and the reaction of the system specified for those cases.  It just means that some users (players) have decided that tripping over those things when they happen is an acceptable thing, or that they can rely on more knowledgeable skaters on their line to help them manage the situation.

As a programmer, I have far too much experience with handwavy generalities that lead to confused and inconsistent implementations.

Kill it NJRD! 
(For those of you who don’t know, The Nashvillians currently en route to the JRDA Championships)
(No really, go kill it yah lil badasses.)
(ok most of y’all aren’t that small any more, what is going on with that?)
(seriously, some of you are bigger than I am.  WAT.)

Kill it NJRD! 

(For those of you who don’t know, The Nashvillians currently en route to the JRDA Championships)

(No really, go kill it yah lil badasses.)

(ok most of y’all aren’t that small any more, what is going on with that?)

(seriously, some of you are bigger than I am.  WAT.)