I skate for the Nashville Rollergirls, but all opinions are my own. Expect derby and lots of it. Possible musings as well. Donno.

 

Speaking up is hard

realsocialskills:

In just about every group conflict I’ve witnessed or participated in, I’ve seen some version of this happen:

  • Some people will speak up about something
  • There will be a conversation that gets heated
  • Someone else will be very uncomfortable with the fact that conflict is happening (despite…

Don't treat a jerk problem as a conflict skills problem

realsocialskills:

Conflict resolution training only helps when the problem is that people’s communication skills are weak in ways that cause them to escalate conflicts unnecessarily. In that situation, learning better communication (and especially listening) skills can make a big difference. But, not every problem…

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

Tricks for the tool box; Part 1 - Harrisburg Roller Derby | Examiner.com

scramjet-derby-girl:

Things that you may (or may not) have heard before- all of which will come in handy as a new derby player!

Not bad, and the twist seems to have been discarded in favor if the stronger push that square shoulders gives. I think that is a mistake.

I would add in this one: learn to move each foot independently. This means being able to balance on one foot at the oddest times, being able to switch foot is in front, and to know how to catch an edge on one foot while the other is still rolling

http://hermionefuckingdanger.tumblr.com/post/98778471299/so-i-fell-at-derby-sunday-and-i-cracked-my-head-i

hermionefuckingdanger:

So I fell at derby sunday and I cracked my head (I was wearing a good helmet) on the floor and it huuuuuuurt oh my gosh. I’m not concussed or anything, but if that’s only like a tenth of what a concussion feels like, I do not EVER want to experience an actual one.

But it hurt so bad and I was so…

Actually, “I was so spacey” sounds like a low end concussion. You should prolly have an assessment.

Concussions, even low end ones, are no joke. Make sure you treat them like a broken brain, give yourself time to heal. It is easy to get a second, and worse, concussion when you are recovering.

7 Things Every Boss Should Know About Their Autistic Employees

derbyonthespectrum:

Most of this advice definitely applies to coaches, captains, league leadership, or even peers in derby situations as well.

abombnabull:

Luz Chaos has been one of my favorites to watch this season. Look at her forcing the call off. She hit out the jammer and alerted her blockers to bridge up and recycle.

She is fun to dance with.  On the track, I didn’t dance with her at the after party.  :D

abombnabull:

Luz Chaos has been one of my favorites to watch this season. Look at her forcing the call off. She hit out the jammer and alerted her blockers to bridge up and recycle.

She is fun to dance with. On the track, I didn’t dance with her at the after party. :D

Inedpendent luxury

schiedsrichtermarmalade:

Sorry, kids, but Roller Derby referees are going to stay mostly league-affiliated for the foreseeable future. AND. THEY. SHOULD.

I know, you can name some number of free-range zebras in your area and cite their existence as proof that unaffiliated officials can and should be the norm.
And…

This Is War

fivesecondskategear:

Bear with me. This is a blog about Derby.

I took six years of martial arts. Two different styles. I would go six days a week, two hours a night.

And I was amazing.

Even when I was 16, I was 5’10”, 165 pounds of muscle and fat. I wasn’t quick, but I was strong. I went face to face with…

Yep. As another ex-martial artist turned derby skater, it totally get it. I never had the anxiety that you mention, but I did have that feeling of loneliness and it only being you vs them. It is why I love pack work, that sense of working WITH people has never lost its novelty and joy

Each season the derby community learns something new in both pack play and jamming. It starts around playoffs and champs*, with the top 15 teams showing us what they have been working on, and the rest of derby picking it up to work on next season.
It is to early to say for sure, but to me this year has been the year of trying to figure out how not to just PUSH as jammers, and in the pack it has been the re-emergence of positional pickups, and a demonstration of effective set offensive plays against different formations.

So far. :D

*you could argue there is an ECDX wave as well.

If I were to hazard a guess, I would say that next year will be jammers using height changes for wall breaking. I would guess that blockers will be rediscovering their shoulders (for positional play) and a further focus on blocking formations that morph based on the current stage of contact with the other team.

(Just a guess, but I have been right before.)